The White Ambassador (2011)

Greetings, White People! I am your ambassador. Some black people think we stink, simply because we are white. Can we change their minds? As your ambassador, I will try.

Complete performance history:
11/26/11 - 1p @ 125th St and Lenox Ave
11/29/11 - 10:30a @ 125th St and Lexington Ave
12/1/11 - 3p @ 125th St and Lenox Ave
12/4/11 - 2p @ 125th St and Lexington Ave
12/7/11 - 3p @ 125th St and Lexington Ave
12/10/11 - 2p @ 125th St and Lexington Ave
12/11/11 - 10a @ 125th St and Lexington Ave
12/13/11 - 8:30a @ 125th St and Lexington Ave
12/16/11 - 3p @ 86th St and Lexington Ave
12/18/11 - 1p @ 86th St and Lexington Ave
12/20/11 - 6p @ 86th St and Lexington Ave
12/21/11 - 1p @ 125th St and Lexington Ave
12/31/11 - 1p @ 125th St and Lexington Ave

Concept edited by Ty Hardaway

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Synopsis

The White Ambassador started by going to Harlem to tell black people that they could be racist, but many said they didn’t have enough power to be racist. Therefore, he adjusted his approach to say that black people could have prejudice. That was received better but still not well, and three common arguments arose — “White people started it”, “White people don’t care what we think”, and "White people don't need to be defended". From there, The White Ambassador made more adjustments. He decided before criticizing blacks in Harlem, he would first admit his own racist past in front of them. Following this, The White Ambassador went to the Upper East Side to see if white people cared or not what blacks said. He was mostly ignored by white people in the street. Perhaps it was because they weren't aware of the stereotype, or they didn't care, or the ambassador was intimidating in whiteface. He returned to Harlem and told black folks that he didn’t find that white people cared about the comments of black people, and they were right in the first place.

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Chronological Details:

1. The White Ambassador went to Harlem to tell black people that they could be racist, but in response he was often told that black people lacked the power to be racist.
(12/4/11 Harlem audio clip below)

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2. He was often told that compared to white people, black people could not be considered racist.
(12/4/11 Harlem audio clip below)

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3. He was often told that white people didn't need to be defended, and he should fight black stereotypes instead.
(12/4/11 Harlem audio clip below)

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4. After numerous objections, he replaced the word "racist" with "prejudice", but The White Ambassador was still often told his protest was ridiculous because white people didn't care what black people think.
(12/7/11 Harlem audio clip below)

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5. He began to admit to black people in Harlem that he had done wrong things, but then ask why he has to smell like a wet dog because of them?
(12/10/11 Harlem audio clip below)

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6. He was told many times that he should go to white neighborhoods, so that is what he decided to do.
(12/13/11 Harlem audio clip below)

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7. First, he tried vigorously to inspire white people to get interested in his protest against black prejudice.
(12/18/11 Upper East Side video clip below)
PLAY HERE
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8. White people in general ignored The White Ambassador. The ambassador asked, Why don't you care? There was no answer from white people. The ambassador asked himself, Maybe I should stop?
(12/20/11 Upper East Side video clip below)
PLAY HERE
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9. In his return to Harlem, The White Ambassador publicly recognized amongst the black people he was protesting against that white people did not support his movement. To The White Ambassador, white people were not bothered by black prejudice and the comments of black people.
(12/31/11 Harlem video clip below)
PLAY HERE
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Chronological Video:

Harlem - 11/26/11:

Upper East Side - 12/18/11:

Upper East Side - 12/20/11:

Harlem - 12/31/11:

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Photos:

Photo by Tod Seelie

Photo by Tod Seelie

Photo by Tod Seelie

Photo by Tod Seelie

Photo by Tod Seelie

Photo by Tod Seelie

Photo by Tod Seelie